Archive for October, 2010

Woman in Love with Priest

October 29, 2010

If a person is in love he or she does not care for explanations, for laws that somebody made up centuries upon centuries ago. The heart does not understand all/any of that. It only knows that it loves someone and wants to be with that person. Everything else is not important. Why is it wrong to feel what I feel for this priest? He is also a man. Why would there be a scandal if we married? Why does he have to leave the priesthood? I, as a minister’s wife, would be an asset. I would not be a burden, a rope around his neck. I thought about all this when I loved my priest/man years ago. I still want an explanation, will not get one. Eugenia Renskoff

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Docile Cat

October 28, 2010

Sad Cat

I go see her nearly everyday. Her cage is covered with a long sheet or blanket-like piece of cloth. The sad sick cat was not covered when she lived in the parking lot on Havermeyer off Metropolitan Avenue. I don’t want her to go back out. That would be cruel. I wish I could get a reaction from her, something, so I can pet her. She’s a docile feral and she pulls away if I try to get close.

The Old Lady’s Death

October 28, 2010

The Old Lady’s Death 

 They knocked on the door. October 2010 They knocked on the door. “Who is it?” “Police.” The man’s voice was sharp. Nadia, she thought. Something’s happened to Nadia. The woman opened the door. “Come in.” She pulled out 4 chairs for the policemen. “Thanks. Do you know an old woman with short black and white hair, who wore dirty sneakers?” “She likes to wear dirty sneakers. She says she can walk faster in them.” The policeman shook his head. “Wore. She’s dead/” The woman, who had been standing, grabbed the back of a fifth chair and sat down. “Dead? But she was here last night.” “What time did she leave?” The question came from the second cop, the youngest in the group. The woman took a Kleenex and wiped her eyes. “At about 10. I walked her and her dog downstairs.” “There was a fire. Two of the dogs died with her.” “I loved that woman. I was expecting her any minute.” A few minutes later, the policemen left after offering their condolences. She made herself some tea and thought back to that afternoon in the taxi. “Please don’t die. Please don’t die,” she thought as the taxi took them to the hospital. Nadia had come early to her house after she had walked the dog. “I don’t feel well,” she told her friend. The friend saw that her face looked pale and that the shadows under her eyes were more pronounced. “The hospital is nearby. I’ll take you there.” They left the dog in Nadia’s apt. when the first taxi they hailed wouldn’t take him. Nadia and her friend held each other’s hands when they walked up the ER steps. “You’ll be fine,” the friend said with a faint smile. “Yeah,”, Nadia replied. “ I’ll be fine.” She looked at the two double glass doors and sighed. They kept her in the hospital about a week. Her heart wasn’t working the way it should, the doctor told Nadia’s friend. “When she gets back home, she’ll need some looking after. No more hard walking the dogs or anything like that.” Nadia gave her friend the keys to her apt. “Here. Take the 2 smaller dogs for walks. Don’t take the Big One. I was never well enough to teach him.” The friend touched Nadia’s forehead. “Consider it done.” The friend left the hospital and went to Nadia’s place. The two dogs greeted her by waving their tails. She fed them in the living room and went to the kitchen. “Hello, Big One,” The dog smelled her and looked up at her. She put his food in a large bowl. “I just want you to know that your mistress is fine. She’ll be back home in a few days.” The dog’s brown eyes shone. “Who is it?” “Police.” The man’s voice was sharp. Nadia, she thought. Something’s happened to Nadia. The woman opened the door. “Come in.” She pulled out 4 chairs for the policemen. “Thanks. Do you know an old woman with short black and white hair, who wore dirty sneakers?” “She likes to wear dirty sneakers. She says she can walk faster in them.” The policeman shook his head. “Wore. She’s dead/” The woman, who had been standing, grabbed the back of a fifth chair and sat down. “Dead? But she was here last night.” “What time did she leave?” The question came from the second cop, the youngest in the group. The woman took a Kleenex and wiped her eyes. “At about 10. I walked her and her dog downstairs.” “There was a fire. Two of the dogs died with her.” “I loved that woman. I was expecting her any minute.” A few minutes later, the policemen left after offering their condolences. She made herself some tea and thought back to that afternoon in the taxi. “Please don’t die. Please don’t die,” she thought as the taxi took them to the hospital. Nadia had come early to her house after she had walked the dog. “I don’t feel well,” she told her friend. The friend saw that her face looked pale and that the shadows under her eyes were more pronounced. “The hospital is nearby. I’ll take you there.” They left the dog in Nadia’s apt. when the first taxi they hailed wouldn’t take him. Nadia and her friend held each other’s hands when they walked up the ER steps. “You’ll be fine,” the friend said with a faint smile. The Old Lady’s Death by Eugenia Maria Renskoff October 2010 They knocked on the door. “Who is it?” “Police.” The man’s voice was sharp. Nadia, she thought. Something’s happened to Nadia. The woman opened the door. “Come in.” She pulled out 4 chairs for the policemen. “Thanks. Do you know an old woman with short black and white hair, who wore dirty sneakers?” “She likes to wear dirty sneakers. She says she can walk faster in them.” The policeman shook his head. “Wore. She’s dead/” The woman, who had been standing, grabbed the back of a fifth chair and sat down. “Dead? But she was here last night.” “What time did she leave?” The question came from the second cop, the youngest in the group. The woman took a Kleenex and wiped her eyes. “At about 10. I walked her and her dog downstairs.” “There was a fire. Two of the dogs died with her.” “I loved that woman. I was expecting her any minute.” A few minutes later, the policemen left after offering their condolences. She made herself some tea and thought back to that afternoon in the taxi. “Please don’t die. Please don’t die,” she thought as the taxi took them to the hospital. Nadia had come early to her house after she had walked the dog. “I don’t feel well,” she told her friend. The friend saw that her face looked pale and that the shadows under her eyes were more pronounced. “The hospital is nearby. I’ll take you there.” They left the dog in Nadia’s apt. when the first taxi they hailed wouldn’t take him. Nadia and her friend held each other’s hands when they walked up the ER steps. “You’ll be fine,” the friend said with a faint smile. “Yeah,”, Nadia replied. “ I’ll be fine.” She looked at the two double glass doors and sighed. They kept her in the hospital about a week. Her heart wasn’t working the way it should, the doctor told Nadia’s friend. “When she gets back home, she’ll need some looking after. No more hard walking the dogs or anything like that.” Nadia gave her friend the keys to her apt. “Here. Take the 2 smaller dogs for walks. Don’t take the Big One. I was never well enough to teach him.” The friend touched Nadia’s forehead. “Consider it done.” The friend left the hospital and went to Nadia’s place. The two dogs greeted her by waving their tails. She fed them in the living room and went to the kitchen. “Hello, Big One,” The dog smelled her and looked up at her. She put his food in a large bowl. “I just want you to know that your mistress is fine. She’ll be back home in a few days.” The dog’s brown eyes shone. “Yeah,”, Nadia replied. “ I’ll be fine.” She looked at the two double glass doors and sighed. They kept her in the hospital about a week. Her heart wasn’t working the way it should, the doctor told Nadia’s friend. “When she gets back home, she’ll need some looking after. No more hard walking the dogs or anything like that.” Nadia gave her friend the keys to her apt. “Here. Take the 2 smaller dogs for walks. Don’t take the Big One. I was never well enough to teach him.” The friend touched Nadia’s forehead. “Consider it done.” The friend left the hospital and went to Nadia’s place. The two dogs greeted her by waving their tails. She fed them in the living room and went to the kitchen. “Hello, Big One,” The dog smelled her and looked up at her. She put his food in a large bowl. “I just want you to know that your mistress is fine. She’ll be back home in a few days.” The dog’s brown eyes shone.

The Hats

October 21, 2010

Oh, my dears, I once had so many hats! I had hats for the daytime, hats for the afternoon and evening and, best of all, cocktail hats. A French woman used to make them for me, exclusively for me. I’d go to her shop in a trendy part of town. I never had to wait. She would send them to my home with her delivery boy when they were done. And the boxes! They were as elegant as my hats! I’d open them carefully and remove the tissue paper first and then the hat itself. I held them up to get a really good look. They were works of art. The Frenchwoman liked taking trips to Paris twice a year. She had tickets to the designer shows and she’d get the best designs. We lived on the other side of the world, so nobody ever found out. With my beautiful suits and mats I felt–I was–a lady. A lady born to be pleased by everyone.

The Smoke

October 21, 2010

“It’s black in here, “one of the men said, covering his mouth. The woman’s body was by the door, with her left hand holding the keys. Someone touched her. “She is no more,” he said looking at the other two. “Look, there is a watch here,” the second man pointed to her other hand. The third man took the watch. “It’s a Rolex. Must have had money. She won’t need it anymore.” He put it in his trouser pocket, while the other two looked the other way. “Let’s do this quickly, before her family comes.” They heard a bark. “From the bedroom”, the first man said. “It’s a German shepherd. He’s a smart fellow. He went to the one place in the house with an open window.” From the kitchen the third man called out. “There are two more dogs in here. They’re dead. “

The keys

October 15, 2010

The Keys
They had to break the door down. Her body was on the floor. She had been holding the keys in one hand and in the other her Rolex watch. “No more,”, one of the men said. Someone took the Rolex and put it in his pocket.
“There are 2 dogs here,” the third man said from the kitchen. “They’re dead, too.”
They heard a bark. The men looked at one another. “Let’s go see. I think it’s coming from the bedroom.” The bark got louder. They went to one of the bedrooms.
“This big one is a smart fellow,” one of them remarked. “He went to the one place with an open window.”

The Dogs

October 13, 2010

 They were going to keep her in the hospital for about a week. She had a weak heart, the doctor said. The woman’s companion took the keys that were given to her. “Please go and feed them. Take them for walks. The two smaller ones more. The big one doesn’t know how to walk. I was never well enough to teach him.” She patted her friend’s hands. “Consider it done,” her friend said. She left the hospital room and walked as quickly as she could to her elder woman’s apt. She opened the door and the two smaller ones came to greet her, the black one first, then his black and white half brother. The big one was in the kitchen drinking from his water bowl. He saw her and came close to smell her. He looked up. “Your mistress is fine. She’ll be back home soon.”. The dog’s eyes shone.

Dark Victory

October 8, 2010

Dark Victory

What can I do? What will release what’s inside me? There is no shoulder to cry on and all this that I have had inside me for all these months, must have an outlet. I have done nothing wrong that I can think of. I have not hurt or stolen from anyone and this hurtful thing has happened. Dark Victory with Bette Davis is a movie that has great memories for me. I saw it in San Francisco at the old Gateway theater years ago. Now I have checked it out of the library. I can let my tears out as I watch the brave way Judith, the protagonist, faces death at a young age. I can sympathize with her character and put myself in her shoes as she says goodbye to her doctor husband who’s going away on a trip not realizing he’ll never see his wife again. Then she calls her 2 dogs and embraces them one last time. And she walks up the stairs up to her room holding on to the banister for support as her faithful maid watches helplessly with tears in her eyes. She goes to her bed and tells the maid she doesn’t want to be disturbed. The maid bows her head as if praying and removes a few pieces of clothing from the bed. She covers Judith with a comforter and closes the door gently. Judith fades away.

The Suitcase

October 7, 2010

The Suitcase

I am a suitcase, the woman thought trying hard not to cry. Yes, I am like an old and worn out suitcase. I have been rolling from here to there, from one place to another for years and no one wants me. I am tired and I want to go rest somewhere, somewhere where no one will bother me. I have been bothered way too much already. The sun is shining outside today but it is not shining for me. She went to the door, took a look at the messy place she lived in and opened the door. Goodbye, she said. Don’t think it hasn’t been nice cleaning you. It really hasn’t. Let’s be honest. Have nothing to lose now.

The Sick Cat

October 7, 2010

The Sick Cat

Her eyes looked iffy and her white and black fur was dirty, as if she hadn’t taken a bath in years. Something about her shouted illness loud and clear. Now, after a blood test, it seems that she has something bad, maybe cancer or liver disease. No more street or parking lot life for her. She’s almost out of that rough and tumble world.