Archive for December, 2010

December 22, 2010

December 22, 2010

December 22, 2010:

Today would have been her birthday. She was a woman with a hard life. She was a person who never forgot her widowed mother, though she outlived her by 54 years. She lived in Buenos Aires at the height of the Peron era. Evita was the Lady Bountiful who went around being good to her people. My mother admired Evita but knew she could not have her jewels and furs. That was fine with her. She worked in a factory 6 days a week and before she met my father, had lots of suitors. My mother became a mother almost by accident. During my childhood she was the best when I got sick.

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Contrast

December 17, 2010

Contrast

The very best of the Upper East Side—Park Avenue on 70th Street, the Frick mansion on 5th Avenue and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Women walking past me were wearing long and expensive looking mink and fox coats. The subway on 77th and Lexington Avenue just a few blocks down. It is still the Upper East Side but it is not as glamorous. A young Afro American man stood near the tracks. In one hand he had an individual container of Yoplait yogurt. On the floor there were black plastic bags and a can of Welch’s grape juice. The young man moved to and fro and fro and to. He bent down and didn’t move for a few minutes. People walked past him; some looked, others didn’t bother to see him. He moved over to the foot of the stairs and in his other hand held another container with some coins in it.

Chiquito

December 15, 2010

 I knew you for only 6 short weeks. It was brief—too brief. I will never forget you, my little aristocratic dog. I could be myself with you. I could trust you. Not a day goes by that I don’t think of our long walks together. You were a quiet little dog. All you wanted was love and a place to rest. May you Rest in Peace!

December 5th, 2010

December 6, 2010

December 5th, 2010

She was a thin old lady. She wore very thick opaque stockings and black moccasin shoes. When I hugged her, I was afraid she’d break. But she never did. She was stronger than anybody thought. Her little face was wrinkled up and she almost never smiled. She had very little to smile about. Her life was spent getting very early to go to work in the factory near her home, then coming back to take care of her husband and their dog. She was feisty and she didn’t give up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 5th, 2010

She was a thin old lady. She wore very thick opaque stockings and black moccasin shoes. When I hugged her, I was afraid she’d break. But she never did. She was stronger than anybody thought. Her little face was wrinkled up and she almost never smiled. She had very little to smile about. Her life was spent getting very early to go to work in the factory near her home, then coming back to take care of her husband and their dog. She was feisty and she didn’t give up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 7th, 2010

December 6, 2010

 

December 7th, 2010

Today would have been his birthday. He was a Cossack from the Don River. When I was a little girl, he used to speak to me about how proud he was of being a member of such a strong and courageous group of warriors. The Don Cossacks fought for the Czar and were awarded privileges for their services. When the Bolsheviks came in 1917, they lost most everything. I loved my father very much and to this day, I admire what he was and stood for. His life was hard in many ways, but he made it in not only one, but 2 countries. If he had to start from scratch, he didn’t care. He wanted to come to America and leave what he had worked so hard for in another country behind.